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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
blitzer, who is live for us in jerusalem tonight, and anderson cooper and ben wedeman, both in gaza city. wolf, let me start with you if i may. a very tense day with claim and counterclaim coming almost on an hourly basis. there was going to be a cease-fire, then no cease-fire. both sides trading sort of insults and then offering fig leaves. what do you make of it all? as we talk now in the middle of a night there, what do you make of where we really are with this? >> well, throughout most of the day, i thought they were very close to reaching a cease-fire agreement. all the signs looked rather positive. then all of a sudden, on this day, it was getting increasingly more tense in the southern part of israel and what we've been seeing in gaza, very, very bloody as well. you wouldn't know that they are apparently rather close to some sort of a deal, that the egyptian government, the new president, mohammed morsi, seemed to be brokering. they may still get some sort of cease-fire agreement. it looks very tenuous to me right now but you know, sometimes just before, having covered cease-fires
's difficult for all parties, but it's not over and the best choice for all of us is to stop shooting. >> you'll hear more from that exclusive interview in a moment. we begin with cnn's arwa damon live in gaza city. arwa, i had a fascinating conversation with president peres earlier. he's still saying that it could go either way but what is your sense on the ground about the likely prospects of a cease-fire and how long will the israelis give it before committing to a possible ground offensive? >> reporter: the likelihood of a cease-fire seems to be increasingly elusive the longer this does drag on, and all through the night, we have been hearing the sound of air strikes, some of them have actually shook the building that we're standing in. we have also been seeing rockets continuously being fired from gaza city, from the center of the city towards israel. not a lot of optimism on the ground here amongst residents of the city who have been through this on so many occasions in the past, that there will be any sort of cease-fire that is going to take effect in the near future, not to mention on
negotiated with egypt and with the support of the united states, and it promises us what this whole campaign was about. it promises the people of southern israel peace and quiet. it promises them that they no longer have to live in constant fear of an incoming rocket launched from the gaza strip. it promises them for the first time in a very long time the possibility to live a normal life. and from our point of view, if these promises are fulfilled, that's a good thing. >> i understand that also it promises the people of gaza, perhaps, a better future. we're hearing via "the new york times" as i speak to you that the terms also state the underlying grievances of gaza, the movement that impedes through gaza, will be started 24 hours after the cease-fire is in effect. now, that is clearly a big move by israel. >> i think it's important to remember the following. there's cause and there's effect. when we pulled out of gaza in 2005, when we took down our settlements and pulled back to the international frontier, there were no restrictions in place whatsoever. our restrictions were in place when
states and it promises us the people of southern israel peace and quiet. that they no longer have to fear rockets coming in. the promise of the possibility to live a normal life. >> i understand that it promises the people of gaza a better future we are hearing by the "new york times" that the terms stayed that under lying grievances the border restrictions the movement of people and goods will be addressed 24 hours after the cease fire is in effect. that is a big move by israel. i think it is important to remember the following, the there is cause and effect. when we pulled out of gaza and pulled back, there were no restrictions in place. that they no longer have to fear rockets coming in. the promise of the possibility to live a normal life. >> i understand that it promises the people of gaza a better future we are hearing by the "new york times" that the terms stayed that under lying grievances the border restrictions the movement of people and goods will be addressed 24 hours after the cease fire is in effect. that is a big move by israel. i think it is important to remember the follo
countries see opportunity in the united states of america. thanks for joining us. >>> good evening. breaking news tonight. you're looking live at a tense and fearful gaza city but what you can't see, thousands of israeli troops with tanks and armored vehicles poised on gaza's borders ready to invade if israel believes there's no chance for a cease-fire in its conflict with hamas. the world is watching and waiting. this was the scene earlier today. tonight, i talked to both sides of the conflict, listen to what israel's president, shimon peres, tells me about the looming threat of all-out war. you do believe, mr. president, that a ground war may be inevitable? >> well, i hope that we achieve cease-fire. the negotiations are still being continued. it's difficult for all parties, but it's not over and the best choice for all of us is to stop shooting. >> you'll hear more from that exclusive interview in a moment. we begin with cnn's arwa damon live in gaza city. arwa, i had a fascinating conversation with president peres earlier. he's still saying that it could go either way but what
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)